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Overview
Comment:Consistently use ` instead of ' to surround individual characters
Downloads: Tarball | ZIP archive | SQL archive
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | glob-docs
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA3-256:565685b5c8d041a3b83920e20f6a24b7bf58a4be913925e842ba2d0f09e35d1f
User & Date: andygoth 2017-04-16 01:11:30
Context
2017-04-18
01:29
Substantial and minor changes to the file globs document taking advice from Warren Young's email. check-in: 1239b6c4 user: rberteig tags: glob-docs
2017-04-16
01:11
Consistently use ` instead of ' to surround individual characters check-in: 565685b5 user: andygoth tags: glob-docs
01:09
Mention difference between Fossil globs and Unix shell globs check-in: 8df6df49 user: andygoth tags: glob-docs
Changes
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Changes to www/globs.md.

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   `[^`. At any other place, `]` ends the list. 
 * Include `^` in a list by placing anywhere except first after the
   `[`.


Some examples:

    [a-d]   Matches any one of 'a', 'b', 'c', or 'd'
    [a-]    Matches either 'a' or '-'
    [][]    Matches either ']' or '['
    [^]]    Matches exactly one character other than ']'
    []^]    Matches either ']' or '^'

The glob is compared to the canonical name of the file in the checkout
tree, and must match the entire name to be considered a match.

Unlike typical Unix shell globs, wildcard sequences are allowed to
match '/' directory separators as well as the initial '.' in the name
of a hidden file or directory.

A list of GLOBs is simply one or more GLOBs separated by whitespace or
commas. If a GLOB must contain a space or comma, it can be quoted with
either single or double quotation marks.

Since a newline is considered to be whitespace, a list of GLOBs in a
................................................................................
This has some consequences. 

The simplest GLOB pattern is just a bare name of a file named with the
usual assortment of allowed file name characters. Such a pattern
matches that one file: the GLOB `README` matches only a file named
`README` in the root of the tree. The GLOB `*/README` would match a
file named `README` anywhere except the root, since the glob requires
that at least one '/' be in the name. (Recall that `/` matches the
directory separator regardless of whether it is `/` or `\` on your
system.)




## Where are they used







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   `[^`. At any other place, `]` ends the list. 
 * Include `^` in a list by placing anywhere except first after the
   `[`.


Some examples:

    [a-d]   Matches any one of `a`, `b`, `c`, or `d`
    [a-]    Matches either `a` or `-`
    [][]    Matches either `]` or `[`
    [^]]    Matches exactly one character other than `]`
    []^]    Matches either `]` or `^`

The glob is compared to the canonical name of the file in the checkout
tree, and must match the entire name to be considered a match.

Unlike typical Unix shell globs, wildcard sequences are allowed to
match `/` directory separators as well as the initial `.` in the name
of a hidden file or directory.

A list of GLOBs is simply one or more GLOBs separated by whitespace or
commas. If a GLOB must contain a space or comma, it can be quoted with
either single or double quotation marks.

Since a newline is considered to be whitespace, a list of GLOBs in a
................................................................................
This has some consequences. 

The simplest GLOB pattern is just a bare name of a file named with the
usual assortment of allowed file name characters. Such a pattern
matches that one file: the GLOB `README` matches only a file named
`README` in the root of the tree. The GLOB `*/README` would match a
file named `README` anywhere except the root, since the glob requires
that at least one `/` be in the name. (Recall that `/` matches the
directory separator regardless of whether it is `/` or `\` on your
system.)




## Where are they used