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Comment:Fix typos.
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SHA3-256: e693ab734e39f2e153de3555a95843ea8606d1b25fe48312c0b30f6792a3bc39
User & Date: ashepilko 2020-01-09 20:03:31
Context
2020-01-09
20:57
Merge the latest SQLite 3.31.0 alpha sources for testing. check-in: 5c48142d user: drh tags: trunk
20:03
Fix typos. check-in: e693ab73 user: ashepilko tags: trunk
15:29
Modify the /doc webpage so that if the first term of the argument is "latest" it chooses the most recent check-in for the document regardless of what branch that check-in occurred on. check-in: d08bc9e6 user: drh tags: trunk
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Changes to src/makeheaders.html.

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Finally, makeheaders also includes a &#8220;<code>-doc</code>&#8221; option.
This command line option prevents makeheaders from generating any
headers at all.
Instead, makeheaders will write to standard output
information about every definition and declaration that it encounters
in its scan of source files.
The information output includes the type of the definition or
declaration and any comment that preceeds the definition or
declaration.
The output is in a format that can be easily parsed, and is
intended to be read by another program that will generate
documentation about the program.
We'll talk more about this feature later.
</p>

................................................................................
named &#8220;<code>alpha.h</code>&#8221;.
For that reason, you don't want to use that name for
any of the .h files you write since that will prevent makeheaders
from generating the .h file automatically.
</p>

<p>
The structure of a .c file intented for use with makeheaders is very
simple.
All you have to do is add a single &#8220;<code>#include</code>&#8221; to the
top of the file that sources the header file that makeheaders will generate.
Hence, the beginning of a source file named &#8220;<code>alpha.c</code>&#8221;
might look something like this:
</p>

................................................................................
<a name="H0009"></a>
<h3>3.3 How To Avoid Having To Write Any Header Files</h3>

<p>
In my experience, large projects work better if all of the manually
written code is placed in .c files and all .h files are generated
automatically.
This is slightly different for the traditional C method of placing
the interface in .h files and the implementation in .c files, but
it is a refreshing change that brings a noticable improvement to the
coding experience.
Others, I believe, share this view since I've
noticed recent languages (ex: java, tcl, perl, awk) tend to
support the one-file approach to coding as the only option.
</p>

<p>
................................................................................
it were a .h file by enclosing that part of the .c file within:
<pre>
   #if INTERFACE
   #endif
</pre>
Thus any structure definitions that appear after the
&#8220;<code>#if INTERFACE</code>&#8221; but before the corresponding
&#8220;<code>#endif</code>&#8221; are eligable to be copied into the
automatically generated
.h files of other .c files.
</p>

<p>
If you use the &#8220;<code>#if INTERFACE</code>&#8221; mechanism in a .c file,
then the generated header for that .c file will contain a line
................................................................................
</p>

<p>
That isn't the complete truth, actually.
The semantics of C are such that once an object becomes visible
outside of a single source file, it is also visible to any user
of the library that is made from the source file.
Makeheaders can not prevent outsiders for using non-exported resources,
but it can discourage the practice by refusing to provide prototypes
and declarations for the services it does not want to export.
Thus the only real effect of the making an object exportable is
to include it in the output makeheaders generates when it is run
using the -H command line option.
This is not a perfect solution, but it works well in practice.
</p>
................................................................................
  v1 = 0;
}
</pre></blockquote>

<p>
The first form is preferred because only a single declaration of
the constructor is required.  The second form requires two declarations,
one in the class definition and one on the defintion of the constructor.
</p>

<h4>3.6.1 C++ Limitations</h4>

<p>
Makeheaders does not understand more recent
C++ syntax such as templates and namespaces.
................................................................................
<ul>
<li> The name of the object.
<li> The type of the object.  (Structure, typedef, macro, etc.)
<li> Flags to indicate if the declaration is exported (contained within
     an EXPORT_INTERFACE block) or local (contained with LOCAL_INTERFACE).
<li> A flag to indicate if the object is declared in a C++ file.
<li> The name of the file in which the object was declared.
<li> The complete text of any block comment that preceeds the declarations.
<li> If the declaration occurred inside a preprocessor conditional
     (&#8220;<code>#if</code>&#8221;) then the text of that conditional is
     provided.
<li> The complete text of a declaration for the object.
</ul>
The exact output format will not be described here.
It is simple to understand and parse and should be obvious to







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...
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...
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....
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Finally, makeheaders also includes a &#8220;<code>-doc</code>&#8221; option.
This command line option prevents makeheaders from generating any
headers at all.
Instead, makeheaders will write to standard output
information about every definition and declaration that it encounters
in its scan of source files.
The information output includes the type of the definition or
declaration and any comment that precedes the definition or
declaration.
The output is in a format that can be easily parsed, and is
intended to be read by another program that will generate
documentation about the program.
We'll talk more about this feature later.
</p>

................................................................................
named &#8220;<code>alpha.h</code>&#8221;.
For that reason, you don't want to use that name for
any of the .h files you write since that will prevent makeheaders
from generating the .h file automatically.
</p>

<p>
The structure of a .c file intended for use with makeheaders is very
simple.
All you have to do is add a single &#8220;<code>#include</code>&#8221; to the
top of the file that sources the header file that makeheaders will generate.
Hence, the beginning of a source file named &#8220;<code>alpha.c</code>&#8221;
might look something like this:
</p>

................................................................................
<a name="H0009"></a>
<h3>3.3 How To Avoid Having To Write Any Header Files</h3>

<p>
In my experience, large projects work better if all of the manually
written code is placed in .c files and all .h files are generated
automatically.
This is slightly different from the traditional C method of placing
the interface in .h files and the implementation in .c files, but
it is a refreshing change that brings a noticeable improvement to the
coding experience.
Others, I believe, share this view since I've
noticed recent languages (ex: java, tcl, perl, awk) tend to
support the one-file approach to coding as the only option.
</p>

<p>
................................................................................
it were a .h file by enclosing that part of the .c file within:
<pre>
   #if INTERFACE
   #endif
</pre>
Thus any structure definitions that appear after the
&#8220;<code>#if INTERFACE</code>&#8221; but before the corresponding
&#8220;<code>#endif</code>&#8221; are eligible to be copied into the
automatically generated
.h files of other .c files.
</p>

<p>
If you use the &#8220;<code>#if INTERFACE</code>&#8221; mechanism in a .c file,
then the generated header for that .c file will contain a line
................................................................................
</p>

<p>
That isn't the complete truth, actually.
The semantics of C are such that once an object becomes visible
outside of a single source file, it is also visible to any user
of the library that is made from the source file.
Makeheaders can not prevent outsiders from using non-exported resources,
but it can discourage the practice by refusing to provide prototypes
and declarations for the services it does not want to export.
Thus the only real effect of the making an object exportable is
to include it in the output makeheaders generates when it is run
using the -H command line option.
This is not a perfect solution, but it works well in practice.
</p>
................................................................................
  v1 = 0;
}
</pre></blockquote>

<p>
The first form is preferred because only a single declaration of
the constructor is required.  The second form requires two declarations,
one in the class definition and one on the definition of the constructor.
</p>

<h4>3.6.1 C++ Limitations</h4>

<p>
Makeheaders does not understand more recent
C++ syntax such as templates and namespaces.
................................................................................
<ul>
<li> The name of the object.
<li> The type of the object.  (Structure, typedef, macro, etc.)
<li> Flags to indicate if the declaration is exported (contained within
     an EXPORT_INTERFACE block) or local (contained with LOCAL_INTERFACE).
<li> A flag to indicate if the object is declared in a C++ file.
<li> The name of the file in which the object was declared.
<li> The complete text of any block comment that precedes the declarations.
<li> If the declaration occurred inside a preprocessor conditional
     (&#8220;<code>#if</code>&#8221;) then the text of that conditional is
     provided.
<li> The complete text of a declaration for the object.
</ul>
The exact output format will not be described here.
It is simple to understand and parse and should be obvious to