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Comment:Tweak format of initial list of special characters to match format of examples given two sections below
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User & Date: andygoth 2017-05-04 14:52:24
Context
2017-05-08
23:00
Final proofreading of file glob patterns document before merging to trunk. Also updated the permuted index to match mkindex.tcl and the current glob article title. Closed-Leaf check-in: ea1fd253 user: rberteig tags: glob-docs
2017-05-04
14:52
Tweak format of initial list of special characters to match format of examples given two sections below check-in: 160b9852 user: andygoth tags: glob-docs
2017-05-01
13:57
Assorted tweaks to new Platform Quirks section of www/globs.md after re-reading it. check-in: a53d3b7d user: wyoung tags: glob-docs
Changes
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Changes to www/globs.md.

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Ordinary characters consume a single character of the target and must
match it exactly. 

Special characters (and special character sequences) consume zero or
more characters from the target and describe what matches. The special
characters (and sequences) are:

    *       Matches any sequence of zero or more characters.
    ?       Matches exactly one character.
    [...]   Matches one character from the enclosed list of characters.
    [^...]  Matches one character not in the enclosed list.

Special character sequences have some additional features: 

 *  A range of characters may be specified with `-`, so `[a-d]` matches
    exactly the same characters as `[abcd]`. Ranges reflect Unicode
    code points without any locale-specific collation sequence.
 *  Include `-` in a list by placing it last, just before the `]`.
................................................................................
 *  Beware that a range must be specified from low value to high
    value: `[z-a]` does not match any character at all, preventing the
    entire glob from matching.
 *  Note that unlike typical Unix shell globs, wildcards (`*`, `?`,
    and character lists) are allowed to match `/` directory
    separators as well as the initial `.` in the name of a hidden
    file or directory.


Some examples of character lists: 

 *  `[a-d]` Matches any one of `a`, `b`, `c`, or `d` but not `ä`;
 *  `[^a-d]` Matches exactly one character other than `a`, `b`, `c`,
    or `d`; 
 *  `[0-9a-fA-F]` Matches exactly one hexadecimal digit;







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Ordinary characters consume a single character of the target and must
match it exactly. 

Special characters (and special character sequences) consume zero or
more characters from the target and describe what matches. The special
characters (and sequences) are:

 *  `*` Matches any sequence of zero or more characters;
 *  `?` Matches exactly one character;
 *  `[...]` Matches one character from the enclosed list of characters; and
 *  `[^...]` Matches one character not in the enclosed list.

Special character sequences have some additional features: 

 *  A range of characters may be specified with `-`, so `[a-d]` matches
    exactly the same characters as `[abcd]`. Ranges reflect Unicode
    code points without any locale-specific collation sequence.
 *  Include `-` in a list by placing it last, just before the `]`.
................................................................................
 *  Beware that a range must be specified from low value to high
    value: `[z-a]` does not match any character at all, preventing the
    entire glob from matching.
 *  Note that unlike typical Unix shell globs, wildcards (`*`, `?`,
    and character lists) are allowed to match `/` directory
    separators as well as the initial `.` in the name of a hidden
    file or directory.


Some examples of character lists: 

 *  `[a-d]` Matches any one of `a`, `b`, `c`, or `d` but not `ä`;
 *  `[^a-d]` Matches exactly one character other than `a`, `b`, `c`,
    or `d`; 
 *  `[0-9a-fA-F]` Matches exactly one hexadecimal digit;