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Overview
Comment:Fixed up the quickstart to present information in a more logical order.
Downloads: Tarball | ZIP archive | SQL archive
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | ttmrichter
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA1:43472d55f31dc4b191bed0e11955ae20ba43741c
User & Date: michael 2010-06-18 03:21:48
Context
2010-06-23
02:21
Merging trunk into private branch. check-in: 54d0648f user: michael tags: ttmrichter
2010-06-18
03:21
Fixed up the quickstart to present information in a more logical order. check-in: 43472d55 user: michael tags: ttmrichter
2010-05-25
12:30
Fix typo in the Self-Hostiry Repositories page. Ticket [e39122fcc434125c6]. check-in: f19de0b0 user: drh tags: trunk
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Changes to www/quickstart.wiki.

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    <a href="http://www.fossil-scm.org/download.html">precompiled binary</a>
    or <a href="build.wiki">build it yourself</a> from sources.
    Install fossil by putting the fossil binary
    someplace on your PATH environment variable.</p>
    
</blockquote>
<a name="fslclone"></a>



































<h2>Cloning An Existing Repository</h2><blockquote>

    <p>Most fossil operations interact with a repository that is on the
    local disk drive, not on a remote system.  Hence, before accessing
    a remote repository it is necessary to make a local copy of that
    repository.  Making a local copy of a remote repository is called
    "cloning".</p>
................................................................................
    which in the example above is named "myclone.fossil".
    You can name your repositories anything you want.  The ".fossil" suffix
    is not required.</p>

    <p>Note: If you are behind a restrictive firewall, you might need
    to <a href="#proxy">specify an HTTP proxy</a> to use.</p>
    
</blockquote><h2>Starting A New Project</h2><blockquote>

    <p>To start a new project with fossil, create a new empty repository
    this way:</p>
    
    <blockquote>
    <b>fossil new </b><i> repository-filename</i>
    </blockquote>
    
</blockquote><h2>Configuring Your Local Repository</h2><blockquote>
    
    <p>When you create a new repository, either by cloning an existing
    project or create a new project of your own, you usually want to do some
    local configuration.  This is easily accomplished using the webserver
    that is built into fossil.  Start the fossil webserver like this:</p>
    
    <blockquote>
    <b>fossil ui </b><i> repository-filename</i>
    </blockquote>

    <p>This starts a web server then automatically launches your
    web browser and makes it point to this web server.  If your system
    has an unusual configuration, fossil might not be able to figure out
    how to start your web browser.  In that case, first tell fossil
    where to find your web browser using a command like this:</p>

    <blockquote>
    <b>fossil setting web-browser </b><i>  path-to-web-browser</i>
    </blockquote>
   
    <p>By default, fossil does not require a login for HTTP connections
    coming in from the IP loopback address 127.0.0.1.  You can, and perhaps
    should, change this after you create a few users.</p>
    
    <p>When you are finished configuring, just press Control-C or use
    the <b>kill</b> command to shut down the mini-server.</p>

</blockquote><h2>Checking Out A Local Tree</h2><blockquote>

    <p>To work on a project in fossil, you need to check out a local
    copy of the source tree.  Create the directory you want to be
    the root of your tree and cd into that directory.  Then
    do this:</p>
    
................................................................................
    <b>fossil status</b><br>
    <b>fossil changes</b><br>
    <b>fossil timeline</b><br>
    <b>fossil leaves</b><br>
    <b>fossil ls</b><br>
    <b>fossil branch list</b><br>
    </blockquote>
































</blockquote><h2>Making Changes</h2><blockquote>

    <p>To add new files to your project, or remove old files, use these
    commands:</p>

    <blockquote>







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    <a href="http://www.fossil-scm.org/download.html">precompiled binary</a>
    or <a href="build.wiki">build it yourself</a> from sources.
    Install fossil by putting the fossil binary
    someplace on your PATH environment variable.</p>
    
</blockquote>
<a name="fslclone"></a>

<h2>General Work Flow</h2><blockquote>

    <p>Fossil works with repository files, a database with the project's
    complete history, and with checked-out local trees, the working directory
    you use to do your work.  In most operations that require you to work on a
    specific repository you must have a checked out tree in place to work  from.
    The resulting workflow looks like this:</p>

    <ul>
        <li>Create or clone a repository file.  (<b>fossil new</b> or
            <b>fossil clone</b>)
        <li>Check out a local tree.  (<b>fossil open</b>)
        <li>Perform operations on the repository (including repository
            configuration).
        <li><em>Optionally</em> close the local tree.  (<b>fossil
            close</b>, but this is rarely used.)
    </ul>

    <p>The following sections will give you a brief overview of these
    operations.</p>

</blockquote>

<h2>Starting A New Project</h2><blockquote>

    <p>To start a new project with fossil, create a new empty repository
    this way:</p>
    
    <blockquote>
    <b>fossil new </b><i> repository-filename</i>
    </blockquote>

</blockquote>
    
<h2>Cloning An Existing Repository</h2><blockquote>

    <p>Most fossil operations interact with a repository that is on the
    local disk drive, not on a remote system.  Hence, before accessing
    a remote repository it is necessary to make a local copy of that
    repository.  Making a local copy of a remote repository is called
    "cloning".</p>
................................................................................
    which in the example above is named "myclone.fossil".
    You can name your repositories anything you want.  The ".fossil" suffix
    is not required.</p>

    <p>Note: If you are behind a restrictive firewall, you might need
    to <a href="#proxy">specify an HTTP proxy</a> to use.</p>
    





































</blockquote><h2>Checking Out A Local Tree</h2><blockquote>

    <p>To work on a project in fossil, you need to check out a local
    copy of the source tree.  Create the directory you want to be
    the root of your tree and cd into that directory.  Then
    do this:</p>
    
................................................................................
    <b>fossil status</b><br>
    <b>fossil changes</b><br>
    <b>fossil timeline</b><br>
    <b>fossil leaves</b><br>
    <b>fossil ls</b><br>
    <b>fossil branch list</b><br>
    </blockquote>

</blockquote><h2>Configuring Your Local Repository</h2><blockquote>
    
    <p>When you create a new repository, either by cloning an existing
    project or create a new project of your own, you usually want to do some
    local configuration.  This is easily accomplished using the webserver
    that is built into fossil.  Start the fossil webserver like this:</p>
    
    <blockquote>
    <b>fossil ui </b><i> repository-filename</i>
    </blockquote>

    <p>(Note that this requires you to have checked out a local tree
    beforehand.)</p>

    <p>This starts a web server then automatically launches your
    web browser and makes it point to this web server.  If your system
    has an unusual configuration, fossil might not be able to figure out
    how to start your web browser.  In that case, first tell fossil
    where to find your web browser using a command like this:</p>

    <blockquote>
    <b>fossil setting web-browser </b><i>  path-to-web-browser</i>
    </blockquote>
   
    <p>By default, fossil does not require a login for HTTP connections
    coming in from the IP loopback address 127.0.0.1.  You can, and perhaps
    should, change this after you create a few users.</p>
    
    <p>When you are finished configuring, just press Control-C or use
    the <b>kill</b> command to shut down the mini-server.</p>

</blockquote><h2>Making Changes</h2><blockquote>

    <p>To add new files to your project, or remove old files, use these
    commands:</p>

    <blockquote>