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Overview
Comment:Server Documentation Update. This ckeckin contains instructions for using Fossil as a windows service and with stunnel as an https proxy.
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SHA3-256: 8b7c563d4999f99150b16be3a902ced19014b78527cc9d42cf2ae793a1c3acd5
User & Date: ckennedy 2019-08-15 16:16:22
Context
2019-08-16
01:58
Merged recent spell check fixes into this branch so we don't revert any of them. check-in: a9fd086f user: wyoung tags: server-docs
2019-08-15
16:16
Server Documentation Update. This ckeckin contains instructions for using Fossil as a windows service and with stunnel as an https proxy. check-in: 8b7c563d user: ckennedy tags: server-docs
2019-08-13
23:29
Additional documentation on CGI configuration options. Updates to the change log. New hyperlinks interconnecting the various documents. check-in: fbc3b2f7 user: drh tags: trunk
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Added www/server/windows/index.md.











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# Using Windows as a Fossil Server

- [Fossil as a Service](service.md)
- [Using stunnel with Fossil on Windows](stunnel.md)

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# Fossil as a Windows Service

If you need Fossil to start automatically on Windows, it is suggested to install
Fossil as a Windows Service.

## Assumptions

1. You have Administrative access to a Windows 2012r2 or above server.
2. You have PowerShell 5.1 or above installed.

## Place Fossil on Server

However you obtained your copy of Fossil, it is recommended that you follow
Windows conventions and place it within `\Program Files (x86)\FossilSCM`.  Since
Fossil is a 32bit binary, this is the proper location for the executable.  This
way Fossil is in an expected location and you will have minimal issues with
Windows interfering in your ability to run Fossil as a service.  You will need
Administrative rights to place fossil at the recommended location.  You do NOT
need to add this location to the path, though you may do so if you wish.

## Make Fossil a Windows Service

Luckily the hard work to use Fossil as a Windows Service has been done by the
Fossil team.  We simply have to install it with the proper command line options.
As of Fossil 2.9 the built in `fossil winsrv` command is failing, so an
alternative service install using PowerShell is documented here.  The below
should all be entered as a single line in an Administrative PowerShell console.

```PowerShell
New-Service -Name fossil -DisplayName fossil -BinaryPathName '"C:\Program Files (x86)\FossilSCM\fossil.exe"
server --port 8080 --repolist "D:/Path/to/Repos"' -StartupType Automatic
```

Please note the use of forward slashes in the paths passed to Fossil.  Windows
will accept either back slashes or forward slashes in path names, but Fossil has
a preference for forward slashes.  The use of `--repolist` will make this a
multiple repository server.  If you want to serve only a single repository,
then leave off the `--repolist` parameter and provide the full path to the
proper repository file. Other options are listed in the
[fossil server](/help?cmd=server) documentation.

The service will be installed by default to use the Local Service account.
Since Fossil only needs access to local files, this is fine and causes no
issues.  The service will not be running once installed.  You will need to start
it to proceed (the `-StartupType Automatic` parameter to `New-Service` will
result in the service auto-starting on boot).  This can be done by entering

```PowerShell
Start-Service -Name fossil
```

in the PowerShell console.

Congratulations, you now have a base http accessible Fossil server running on
Windows.

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# Using stunnel with Fossil on Windows

While there are many ways to configure Fossil as a server using various web
servers (Apache, IIS, nginx, etc.), this document will focus on setting up a
minimal Fossil server using only Fossil's native [server
capabilities](server.wiki#standalone) and [stunnel](https://www.stunnel.org/)
to provide a TLS proxy.  It is recommended for public repositories to go to the
extra step of configuring stunnel to provide a proper HTTPS setup.

## Assumptions

1. You have Administrative access to a Windows 2012r2 or above server.
2. You have PowerShell 5.1 or above installed.
3. You have acquired a certificate either from a Public CA or an Internal CA.

These instructions were tested with Fossil 2.10 and stunnel 5.55.  Other
versions may not function in a similar manner.  There is a bug in Fossil 2.9 and
earlier that prevents these versions of Fossil from properly constructing https
URLs when used with stunnel as a proxy.  Please make sure you are using Fossil
2.10 or later on Windows.

## Configure Fossil Service for https

Following most of [Fossil as a Windows Service](service.md), you will need
to change the command to install the Fossil Service to configure it properly for
use with stunnel as an https proxy.  Run the following instead:

```PowerShell
New-Service -Name fossil-secure -DisplayName fossil-secure -BinaryPathName '"C:\Program Files (x86)\FossilSCM\fossil.exe"
server --localhost --port 8080 --https --repolist "D:/Path/to/Repos"' -StartupType Automatic

```

The use of `--localhost` means Fossil will only listen for traffic on the local
host on the designated port - 8080 in this case - and will not respond to
network traffic.  Using `--https` will tell Fossil to generate HTTPS URLs rather
than HTTP ones.

`New-Service` does not automatically start a service on install, so you will
need to enter the following to avoid rebooting the server:

```PowerShell
Start-Service -Name fossil-secure
```

## Install stunnel 5.55

Download stunnel from the [downloads](https://www.stunnel.org/downloads.html)
page.  Select the latest stunnel windows package (at the time of writing this is
`stunnel-5.55-win64-installer.exe`).  Execute the installer and make sure you
install openSSL tools when you install stunnel.  You will need this to convert
your certificate from PFX to PEM format.

Even though the installer says it is for win64, it installs stunnel by default
to `\Program Files (x86)\stunnel`.

## Get your certificate ready for Stunnel

Whether you use a Public Certificate Authority or Internal Certificate
Authority, the next step is exporting the certificate from Windows into a format
useable by Stunnel.

### Export Certificate from Windows

If your certificate is installed via Windows Certificate Management, you will
need to export the certificate into a usable format.  You can do this either
using the Windows Certificate Management Console, or PowerShell.

#### Certificate Management Console

Start `mmc.exe` as an Administrator.  Select 'File>Add/Remove Snapin', select
'Certificates' from the list, and click 'Add'.  Select 'Computer Account',
'Next', 'Local Computer', and then 'Finish'.  In the Console Root, expand
'Certificates', then 'Personal', and select 'Certificates'.  In the middle pane
find and select your certificate.  Right click the certificate and select
'All Tasks>Export'.  You want to export as PFX the Private Key, include all
certificates in the certification path, and use a password only to secure the
file.  Enter a path and file name to a working directory and complete the
export.

Continue with [Convert Certificate from PFX to PEM](#convert).

#### PowerShell

If you know the Friendly
Name of the Certificate this is relatively easy.  Since you need to export
the private key as well, you must run the following from an Administrative
PowerShell console.

```PowerShell
$passwd = ConvertTo-SecureString -string "yourpassword" -Force -AsPlainText

Get-ChildItem Cert:\LocalMachine\My | Where{$_.FriendlyName -eq "FriendlyName"} |
Export-PfxCertificate -FilePath fossil-scm.pfx -Password $passwd
```

You will now have your certificate stored as a PFX file.

<a name="convert"></a>
### Convert Certificate from PFX to PEM

For this step you will need the openssl tools that were installed with stunnel.

```PowerShell
# Add stunnel\bin directory to path for this session.
$env:PATH += ";${env:ProgramFiles(x86)}\stunnel\bin"
# Export Private Key
openssl.exe pkcs12 -in fossil-scm.pfx -out fossil-scm.key -nocerts -nodes
# Export the Certificate
openssl.exe pkcs12 -in fossil-scm.pfx -out fossil-scm.pem -nokeys
```

Now move `fossil-scm.key` and `fossil-scm.pem` to your stunnel config directory
(by default this should be located at `\Program Files (x86)\stunne\config`).

## stunnel Configuration

Next, open up the `stunnel.conf` file located at `\Program Files (x86)\stunnel\config`
and add the below section.

```dosini
; proxy to fossil-scm service
[fossil]
accept = 443
connect = 8080
cert = fossil-scm.pem
key = fossil-scm.key
TIMEOUTclose = 0
```

After completing the above configuration restart the stunnel service in Windows
with the following:

```PowerShell
Restart-Service -Name stunnel
```

## Open up port 443 in the Windows Firewall

The following instructions are for the [Windows Advanced
Firewall](https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/threat-protection/windows-firewall/windows-firewall-with-advanced-security).
If you are using a different Firewall, please consult your Firewall
documentation for how to open port 443 for inbound traffic.

The following command should be entered all on one line.

```PowerShell
New-NetFirewallRule -DisplayName "Allow Fossil Inbound" -Description "Allow Fossil inbound on port 443 using Stunnel as TLS Proxy."
  -Direction Inbound -Protocol TCP -LocalPort 443 -Action Allow -Program "C:\Program Files (x86)\Stunnel\bin\stunnel.exe"
```

You should now be able to access your new Fossil Server via HTTPS.